Khasekhemwy

King Khasekhemwy

King Khasekhemwy

Khasekhemwy was the last king of the second dynasty; his reign lasted for about 30 years according to Manetho. He changed his name from Khasekhem to Khasekhemwy, which means the two powerful ones appear.

King Khasekhemwy

His serekh (a hieroglyphic word which means the façade of the palace in which early kings placed their names in before the use of cartouches) is surmounted by both the falcon God Horus, god of living and protection and God Seth, an animal who was known as the god of evilness. for more pieces are here

He probably married a queen from the north to strengthen his relations between both of Upper and Lower Egypt Khasekhemwy has two seated statues, one of them shows him at the Cairo museum, made out of greywacke schist and has him wearing the white 10 crown while the other one in the Ashmolean museum in Oxford was made of limestone.

King Khasekhemwy

 

he was the last king of the second dynasty; his reign lasted for about 30 years according to Manetho. He changed his name from Khasekhem to Khasekhemwy, which means the two powerful ones appear. His serekh (a hieroglyphic word which means the façade of the palace in which early kings placed their names in before the use of cartouches) is surmounted by both the falcon God Horus, god of living and protection and God Seth, an animal who was known as the god of evilness.

He probably married a queen from the north to strengthen his relations between both of Upper and Lower Egypt Khasekhemwy has two seated statues, one of them shows him at the Cairo museum, made out of greywacke schist and has him wearing the white 10 crown while the other one in the Ashmolean museum in Oxford was made of limestone.

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The Statue of Khasekhem

 This statuette belongs to King Khasekhem. It dates back to the second dynasty, and it’s made out of green Schist, which is carried from Sinai. This statuette was discovered in Hierakonpolis (El-Kom Al-Ahmar), by Quibell, in 1989. Two statuettes were originally found, this one which is in the Egyptian Museum now, while the other is made out of limestone and in the Ashmolean museum in Oxford.

The other statuette also wears the white crown of Upper Egypt. There is a theory that says that maybe there was another statuette of the kind wearing the red crown of Lower Egypt as an example of his authority over the two lands.

King Khasekhem was the last king of the second dynasty. During his reign which lasted for about 30 years, he changed his name to Khasekhemwy after he had put down various rebellions from the north who invaded the lands of the South, and refused to recognise his authority over the country, so he put them down and thus united the land; meaning ‘The Two Powerful Ones appear’, the new name incorporated both the Horus falcon and the Seth animal on the serekh. Maybe the second name belongs to his successor. The king is represented here in a seated position over a low back throne.

King Khasekhemwy
King Khasekhemwy

He wears the white crown of Upper Egypt, which is called (HDt) in the Ancient Egyptian Language. Unfortunately the crown and the head are partly damaged, but you still can see the details of the king’s face on the surviving part, with its delight futures, the almond eye, high cheek bone, and even the muscles at the corner of the mouth. His left ear was represented in a very good detail.

The king is wearing the Hb-sd cloak. The Hb-Sd festival was made by the Ancient Egyptian kings to show that they are strong enough to rule Egypt. It was made every 5 or 30 years or even when the king felt that he lost control over the country.

In this festival he shall be crowned twice, one with the white crown of Upper Egypt (HDt) and one with the red crown of Lower Egypt (dSrt), as a symbol that he got the acceptance of the Gods and Goddesses of Upper and Lower Egypt to rule both of them. Even the cloak was depicted with its simple details like the crossing part on the chest, and the long sleeves. The king rests his left arm on his right one which lies on his thigh.

Like what you can see here there is a whole in the right hand, maybe the King used to hold something in it. Then we get to the feet which are also very well represented close to each other and the perfection of the smooth carving of the toes. Between his feet you can see a small, tiny Serkh , but it seems that it doesn’t contain a name. The most important part in this statuette is the base.

It contains the outcome of a cruel battle; the injured bodies of the enemy are about 47,209 in total according to the hieroglyphic inscription on the in front part of the base. They were portrayed as disordered on the battlefield in their death throes. The scene probably celebrates the victory of the king over the people of Lower Egypt who refused to recognise his authority. 

King Khasekhemwy

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